Shakespeare Page 11

Hamlet\'s Treatment of Ophelia and Gertrude Modern folklore suggests women look at a man\'s relationship with his mother to predict how they will treat other women in their life. Hamlet is a good example of a son\'s treatment of his mother reflecting how he will treat the woman he loves because when considering Hamlet\'s attitude and treatment of the Ophelia in William Shakespeare\'s play, Hamlet, one must first consider how Hamlet treated his mother. A characteristic of Hamlet\'s personality is
Hamlet: Antiheroism Antiheroism has always been an interesting aspect of a character that authors have chosen to illustrate. In literature, there has been countless antiheroic characters, from Randle McMurphy in One Flew Over the Cuckoo\'s Nest and Allie Fox in The Mosquito Coast, to others as famous as Robin Hood and ... By literary definition, an antihero is the "hero" of the play or novel, but has negative attributes which separate him or her from the classic hero such as Superman. Such negat
Hamlet and Gertrude: Love or Hate Imagine it, while away at college you receive word that your beloved father who had seemed in good health only a short while ago has died leaving your mother and yourself. This situation would be enough to bring great depression to even the strongest of souls but for Hamlet, the fictional prince of Denmark in Shakespeare\'s play of the same name, this is not his imagination but cruel reality. Not only has his father passed but, as if to mock the very memory of t
The Merchant of Venice: Hath not a Jew Mercy? Kevin Jacoby Many of William Shakespeare\'s plays have sparked controversy. Probably the one that has sparked the most controversy is The Merchant of Venice, which many intellectuals have dubbed an anti-Semitic play. The character that this discussion centers around is Shylock, the rich moneylender Jew. The problem with most of these anti-Semitic arguments is that they lack the perspective of the sixteenth century audience. Throughout Shakespeare\'s
Henry IV: Redemption In Shakespeare\'s Henry IV, the character Hal, the Prince of Wales, undergoes a transformation that can be characterized as a redemption. Shakespeare introduces Hal, in the opening act as a renegade of the Court. His avoidance of all public responsibility and his affinity for the company of the Boar\'s Head Tavern, have caused serious concern for the King, because Hal is heir to the throne. The King realizes that to keep order, a ruler and his heir must prove to be both resp
Henry IV: Hotspur vs. Harry At the beginning of the play it seems that the chief rebel, Hotspur, is in dispute with the King but as the play progresses we find that the main contest is between Hotspur and Hal, the King\'s son. At first thought, Hotspur seems to be the easy winner, for all Hal does is spend his time with his friends gallivanting around, stealing and drinking. Hotspur, on the other hand, has returned from a battle in which he defeated the Scots led by Glendower. He has taken many
A Midsummer Night\'s Dream: Humor Shakespeare uses many ways to portray humor and make his plays a success because of it. He created a careful mix of love with humor to create a success called "A Midsummer Night\'s Dream." The focus of this paper is to describe how Shakespeare uses humor in his play. One way that Shakespeare uses humor in this play is by using plain humor that need not be interpreted in any way. He did this by creating the artisans. The artisans, obviously are not intelligent at
Iago\'s Motivation Iago is a "moral pyromaniac." Harold C. Goddard writes that Iago consciously and unconsciously seeks to destroy the lives of others, especially others with high moral standards (Goddard 76). However, Iago is more than just a "moral pyromaniac," he is a moral pyromaniac whose fire is fueled by pure hatred. He is a hungry powermonger whose appetite for destruction can only be satisfied after he has chewed up and spat out the lives of others. Iago lusts for power, but his sense o
Intensional or Accidentall? Similarities between Romeo And Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing! There are many similarities between Shakespeare\'s Much Ado About Nothing and Romeo and Juliet. Was this Intentional or Accidental? Even though Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy, and Romeo and Juliet, is one of his saddest tragedies, the two plots share many common incidents. Did Shakespeare mean to have these coincidences or did they happen by accident? In both of his dramatic works, the Masque is a k
Is Hamlet Mad? Perhaps the world\'s most famous mental patient, Hamlet\'s sanity has been argued over by countless learned scholars for hundreds of years. As a mere student of advanced-level English Literature, I doubt I can add anything new to the debate in 2000 words, but I can look at the evidence supporting or dispelling each argument and come to my own conclusion. Hamlet is obviously experiencing grief and despair right from the beginning of the novel, with the death of his father and his u
Julius Caesar: Background Knowledge Is Needed To Understand Play Having a good background and knowledge of the history of Rome is very helpful to understand Shakespeare\'s play, Julius Caesar. The setting of this play took place hundreds of years ago, so if one knows a little bit of Roman history, it would help very much in understanding what is going on in the play. It is important to know about the connection, or relationship that there once was between Caesar and Pompey. When Crassus died, Po
Julius Caesar: Brutus Is The Protagonist "He who will not reason is a bigot; he who cannot is a fool; and he who dares not, is a slave." - Sir William Drumman All men have the power to reason. Some men can reason better, and more thorough than others. Yet nonetheless, all men can reason. In order to reason, one must clear his mind, be completely impartial, and understand the situation to the best of his ability. The play Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare, is the story of a man trying his bes
The Taming of the Shrew: Kate\'s Soliloquy Kate\'s soliloquy bring about a joyous conclusion to The Taming of the Shrew. The audience leaves the theatre with a pleasant feeling, glad that such a shrew could be tamed so well. Kate herself realised the error of her ways, making the men feel confident while making the women feel safe. Moreover, the audience found the speech to be very sound and sensible, as the views expressed in the play were extremely popular at that point in time. Kate, in reali
King Lear: Themes Many themes are evident in King Lear, but perhaps one of the most prevalent relates to the theme of justice. Shakespeare has developed a tragedy that allows us to see man\'s decent into chaos. Although Lear is perceived as "a man more sinned against than sinning" (p.62), the treatment of the main characters encourages the reader to reflect on the presence or lack of justice in this world. The characters also vary in their inclination to view the world from either a fatalistic o
King Lear: Lear The Tragic Hero The definition of tragedy in the Oxford dictionary is, "drama of elevated theme and diction and with unhappy ending; sad event, serious accident, calamity." However, the application of this terminology in Shakespearean Tragedy is more expressive. Tragedy does not only mean death or calamity, but in fact, it refers to a series of steps which leads to the downfall of the tragic hero and eventually to his tragic death. Lear, the main character in King Lear was affirm
King Lear: Consequences of One Man\'s Decisions Shakespeare\'s tragedy King Lear is a detailed description of the consequences of one man\'s decisions. This fictitious man is Lear, King of England, who\'s decisions greatly alter his life and the lives of those around him. As Lear bears the status of King he is, as one expects, a man of great power but sinfully he surrenders all of this power to his daughters as a reward for their demonstration of love towards him. This untimely abdication of his
King Lear: Rejection An important idea present in William Shakespeare\'s " King Lear " is rejection and the role this rejection plays in the experiences of the involved characters. The important ideas to be considered here are the causes and effects associated with the act of rejection. The most important situations to be considered in the story of " King Lear " are those that develop between the two fathers, Lear and Gloucester, and their children, Goneril and Regan, Cordelia, Edmund, and Edgar
King Lear: Sense of Renewal Throughout Shakespeare\'s King Lear, there is a sense of renewal, or as L.C. Knights puts it, “affirmation in spite of everything,” in the play. These affirmative actions are vividly seen throughout the play that is highly infused with evil, immorality and perverted values. These glimpses of hope seem to provide the reader with an underlying notion of human goodness that remains present, throughout the lurking presence of immorality and a lack of values. However, in t
King Lear: Suffering Suffering takes on many appearances, depending on how it is received. In King Lear, suffering was very painful to two people, and the giver wasn\'t necessarily an enemy, pain can be from the ones you love. A storm isn\'t something you wouldn\'t think of when pain comes to mind, but it is an element and part of your environment, so are the people one deals with. Pain can come from many areas, both far and near. The enemies in our lives are their to balance the goodness that w
Macbeth: Lady MacBeth Lady MacBeth is one of Shakespeare\'s greatest and most intriguing female characters. She is evil, seductive, and witch-like all at the same time. However, during the play we see her in two different ways. At the time when we first meet her, she is a brutally violent, power wanting witch, and later on she turns to a shameful suicidal grieving woman. At the beginning of the MacBeth, Lady MacBeth is very savage and vicious. She thinks nothing of killing King Duncan. She has n
King Lear: The Use of Letters William Shakespeare used letters as a dramatic device to reveal the characters\' loyalty and betrayal in his play King Lear. The purpose of the letter is to develop the plot and reveal the characters\' attributes. Three letters help to develop the plot and reveal the characters of Edmund, Gloucester, Goneril and Albany. The first letter that appeared on the stage is Edmund\'s false letter. The letter talked about Edgar\'s plan to kill to his father, Gloucester. Edmu
Life of William Shakespeare Around 1568, a group of actors visited Stratford and put on a play before the entire town, with permission from John Shakespeare, the mayor of the town. The people loved the play, especially the small children. All of them looked up to the actors, as they returned each year to perform different plays. They had dreams of one day becoming actors, but only one of these children fulfilled this dream. This child was the mayor\'s son, William Shakespeare. At this time, acto
Much Ado About Nothing: Love, Hate & Marriage - An Analytical Essay on the Relationship of Beatrice & Benedick In William Shakespeare\'s comedy "Much Ado About Nothing", the characters Beatrice and Benedick are involved in what could only be called a "love/hate" relationship. The play is a classic example of this type of relationship, and allows us to view one from the outside looking in. This gives us the chance to analyse the type of relationship that at one time or another we all have been, o
Macbeth: Contrasts of Nature Georganne Hampton In the play, Macbeth, Shakespeare uses contrasts of nature in various ways. He consistently shows us that Macbeth and his wife\'s actions go against nature. The first lines of the play are a condensed version of the unnaturalness of things to come. "In thunder, lightning or in rain?" ( I, i, 2). In nature, thunder, lightening and rain occur together, but Shakespeare\'s use of the word "or" infers the unnatural occurrence of one without the others. "
Macbeth: Protagonist Becoming Evil The story Macbeth is like no other in plot and poetry. It sets itself apart from the rest by having a protagonist becoming evil. What makes Macbeth such a complicated character is the way his outlook keeps on changing throughout the play. This essay will prove that Macbeth is an evil man and was not overpowered by ambition to get what he wanted. This essay will also determine that certain characters like the witches did not force him to do evil; they simply tri
Macbeth: The Weird Sisters In Elizabethan times, witches were a natural part of life. Macbeth witnessed this, as seen in the play Macbeth, by William Shakespeare. The evil forces that the weird sisters, who were witches, possessed, put Macbeth\'s mind in another direction. This direction was the beginning of his moral downfall and the destruction of his destiny. The weird sisters warned Macbeth of this in the three apparitions but he continued living his life without realizing that they were spe
Macbeth: Macbeth A Tragic Hero In the play Macbeth by William Shakespeare, we discover that Macbeth is a tragic hero. Macbeth is very ambitious, courageous, and a moral coward: all these things lead to his tragic death at the end of the play. At the beginning of the play, Shakespeare defines Macbeth as a hero very clearly. From the courages in defense of Scotland is significant in the opening scene. However, he is very ambitious to be king. At the beginning of the play, he was loyal to the king.
What Was the Witches\' Role in Macbeth? In Shakespeare\'s time, many people were superstitious; they believed that that their lives were strongly influenced, if not dictated by fate. They also thought that the world was full of supernatural creatures, such as witches, ghosts, and many other such beings. Shakespeare incorporated these aspects of belief in his play Mac Beth. The witches, although accurately predicting what would occur, i.e., Mac Beth would be king, they did not specify how their p
MacbethL Imagery One of the most important tools in literature is imagery. It is not just in there to fill up paper; rather, there is at least one dramatic purpose for each image and there are many different types of imagery. This essay seeks to prove that in the play Macbeth the author William Shakespeare uses darkness imagery for three dramatic purposes. Those three purposes are, to create atmosphere, to arouse the emotions of the audience and to contribute to the major theme of the play. The
Macbeth: Macbeth\'s Ambition, Courage, and Moral Cowardness Leads To His Death In the play Macbeth by William Shakespeare, we discover that Macbeth is a tragic hero. Macbeth is very ambitious, courageous, and a moral coward: all these things lead to his tragic death at the end of the play. At the beginning of the play, Shakespeare defines Macbeth as a hero very clearly. From the courages in defense of Scotland is significant in the opening scene. However, he is very ambitious to be king. At the
Macbeth: Choices In The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare characters often could not escape the consequences of their choices. The choices that some characters made in the play put them in a position which they could not escape. In most of these cases the character feels remorse for the choice they had made. The characters that I will be concentrating on are Macbeth, Macduff, and Lady Macbeth. These characters are the best examples of how characters could not escape their choices in the
Macbeth: Macbeth - A Tragic Hero "(Sometimes a tragic hero is created, not through his own villainy), but rather through some flaw in him, he being one of those who are in high station and good fortune, like Oedipus and Thyestes and the famous men of such families as those." (Poetics, Aristotle). Every great tragedy is dominated by a protagonist who has within himself a tragic flaw, too much or too little of one of Aristotle\'s twelve virtues. In Macbeth, by William Shakespeare, Macbeth, a great
The Cause of Macbeth\'s Ruin The specific root of Macbeth\'s ruin is his uncontrollable ambition. His desires take control of his actions and this becomes his tragic flaw. It prevents him from becoming aware of when to stop; he is never fully satisfied as his desire for power grows. Macbeth\'s judgment is impaired since he only accepts ideas that will benefit him in obtaining his wants. He also becomes self centered and loses his feeling towards others as a result of his need for fulfillment. Al
Macbeth: Superstitions The tragedy of Macbeth was written by Shakespeare in 1606 and produced in 1610. Macbeth is the most concentrated of Shakespeare\'s tragedies. The action gushes forward with great speed from the beginning to end. The main characters in the play are Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, who are very noble, but their evil ambition ultimately causes their downfall and death. The play focuses around evil, greed and the supernatural. The play was written by Shakespeare for the king at that
Macbeth: An Overview Macbeth is presented as a mature man enjoying an enviable reputation. throughout this Shakespearean play, however, Macbeth\'s emotions change drastically. His abilities in battle are stupendous, yet his abilities as a husband and King are on the contrary. His overvaulting ambitions overcome his morality, and lead him to do “the evil deeds” that he commits during his reign. Macbeth\'s prophecies begin with his encounter with the three evil women, the witches. They put the tho
Is Macbeth The Tragic Hero of The Play? Is Macbeth the tragic hero of the play "Macbeth?" This question may seem to be redundant; however, not all of Shakespeare\'s Tragedies are named after their tragic heroes. For example, Julius Caesar is not the tragic hero of "Julius Caesar." A tragic hero must conform to a set of characteristics which evolved all the way from ancient to medieval times. Macbeth conforms to these characteristics and is the tragic hero of "Macbeth." The death of an ordinary p
The Tempest: Magic The Tempest, written in 1611, was one of William Shakespeare\'s last plays. It has a combination of superb characters, interesting settings, and a good plot line—all held together by the running theme of magic, and its ever- present importance. A closer examination of the magic in The Tempest, and the public\'s view of magic at the time, will give insight as to Shakespeare\'s choice of magic as a theme, and why it has made the play so successful and timeless. Magic presented i
Julius Caesar: Marcus Brutus Character Analysis William Shakespeare\'s play, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, is mainly based on the assassination of Julius Caesar. The character who was in charge of the assassination was, ironically, Marcus Brutus, a servant and close friend to Julius Caesar. But what would cause a person to kill a close friend? After examining Brutus\' relationship to Caesar, his involvement in the conspiracy, and his importance to the plot, the truth can be revealed. Marcus Brut
The Merchant of Venice: A Tragic Play In my opinion the play The Merchant of Venice is a tragic one which is discised as being comic. Many factors of this play are derived from the current voice of situation. The Merchant of Venice could be looked at as more tragic because of the negative intents from some of the characters in the play. Greed and deception are just a couple of the main features from where many of the decisions are derived. For example, revenge was an intent that Sylock had again
A Midsummer Night\'s Dream: Contrast In Human Mentality The Play: “A Midsummer Night\'s Dream”, by William Shakespeare offers a wonderful contrast in human mentality. Shakespeare provides insight into man\'s conflict with the rational versus the emotional characteristics of our behavior through his settings. The rational, logical side is represented by Athens, with its flourishing government and society. The wilder emotional side is represented by the fairy woods. Here things do not make sense,
A Midsummer Night\'s Dream: Women In Elizabethian England I think something very interesting in this play is the way in which woman were seen in Elizabethan England during Shakespeare\'s day. The play gives numerous examples of the way woman are treated as second class citizens; for instance, the laws concerning marriage and the position of men in society. When Hermia states that she does not want to marry Demetrius, the man of her fathers choice, and would rather marry Lysander, she is placed i
A Midsummer Night\'s Dream: Role Of Puck Darryl Chancey The role and character of Puck, or Robin Goodfellow, in A Midsummer Night\'s Dream, is not only entertaining but quite useful. William Shakespeare seems to have created the character of Puck from his own childhood. In Shakespeare\'s time it was believed that fairies and little people did exist. Whenever something went wrong around the farmyard or house or village, incidents such as buckets of milk ‘accidentally\' spilling over, or tools sud
The Taming of the Shrew: Mistaken Identities Throughout the play "The Taming of the Shrew," William Shakespeare has utilized several ingenious techniques resulting in an effective piece of work. One of the more unique and creative methods is the use of mistaken identity. With the use of mistaken identity, Shakespeare has successfully given the play an element of humor from the beginning to the end. The mistaken identity within the two induction scenes must have been quite humorous for the upper-
Much Ado About Nothing: An Overview It is a beautiful spring afternoon. The air is full of the radiance of freshly bloomed daisies and the energizing chill of the periodic spring breeze. Puffy large cumulus clouds fill the azure sky with gray thunderheads looming off in the distance. Looking down from the clouds, one can see a gathering of finely dressed people. Birds flying overhead hear the murmurs of the crowd gathered for a wedding of gentry. Shakespeare could never have planned the first sc
My Perception of William Shakespeare\'s Othello Othello, by William Shakespeare, is perhaps not as exciting as a ravishingly sexy poster of Laurence Fishburne and Irene Jacob. Yet, with its intoxicating mix of love, sexual passion and the deadly power of jealousy, Shakespeare has created an erotic thriller based on a human emotion that people are all familiar with. It all depends on how those people receive it. There is an extraordinary fusion of characters\' with different passions in this trag
Nature To Love Ones In Shakespeare\'s "My Mistress\' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun" and "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer\'s Day?" In the poems "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer\'s Day?" and "My Mistress\' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun", William Shakespeare compares his loved ones to nature. He uses natural elements in order to show that nature is superior to human beings. However, the poet comes to the conclusion that despite the fact that nature is more perfect than human beings, he loves his
Romeo and Juliet: Night - Rejoice or Rebel? Night can be seen in two contrasting ways. The first can be summarized as a time for celebration and love. The second, and most commonly associated with night, is a time of darkness and horror. Two shining examples of the different emotions and reactions brought on by darkness are the books Night by Elie Wiesel and Romeo and Juliet by well-known author, William Shakespeare. In Romeo and Juliet night has a positive image, a welcomed time for love, prote
William Shakespeare: Most Famous of All English Writers William Shakespeare, the most famous of all English writers, has written many works. One such work is Much Ado About Nothing, a comedy that includes humor, love, and deceit. Several incidents in the life of the author influenced him to write this play in the fashion that he did. These events come from his life and the point in history in which he lived, thus producing Much Ado About nothing. Shakespeare\'s life has very much to do with the
Hamlet: Ophelia and Gertrude Ophelia and Gertrude. Two different women who seem to be trapped in the same circumstances in relation to Hamlet. Gertrude, Hamlet\'s mother and the Queen of Denmark. She is married to the present King, Claudius, who is suspected by Hamlet to have killed his father, King Hamlet, who also happens to be Claudius\'s brother. Gerturde has somehow ended up in the plot of King Hamlet\'s death and in the eyes of her son, seems to be a monster and an aide to an adulterating
Othello: Shakespeare\'s Most Tragic Play William Shakespeare have written many plays. His most tragic play is Othello. Othello is also the name of the main character in the play, he is quite hard to understand. In order to have a better understanding of Othello\'s character, examining his changes throughout the play, flaws and why he is considered a tragic hero will give the reader an insight of his overall personality. Othello changes many times throughout the course of the play. At the beginni