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The Dream of Oenghus The Celtic myth, "The Dream of Oenghus," relates the tale of Oenghus the Celtic god of love and his long search for true love. Oenghus is the son of Boann and Daghdhae. Boann the white cow goddess, and Daghdhae the father of all gods, the "good god." In a dream Oenghus sees "the loveliest figure in Ireland…" His memory of this vision makes him ill with loneliness and he begins to waste away. With the help of his mother, and another of his fathers\' sons, Bodhbh, he begins hi
Greek Mythology Mythology was an integral part of the lives of all ancient peoples. The myths of Ancient Greece are the most familiar to us, for they are deeply entrenched in the consciousness of Western civilization. The myths were accounts of the lives of the deities whom the Greeks worshipped. The Greeks had many deities, including 12 principal ones, who lived on Mt. Olympus. The myths are all things to all people – a rollicking good yarn, expressions of deep psychological insights, words of
Creative Writing: Hephaestus and Aphrodite - The Dispute As Hephaestus was walking down Rhea Street on Mount Olympus, he noticed his wife, Aphrodite, kissing Hermes, the messenger-God, next to the area\'s one and only Burger God (very well-known for its char-broiled Whoppers). "Wait just a tootin\' minute," he said aloud to himself. "Why is my wife kissing Hermes? She is supposed to be devoted to me!" He was furious. It was very rare when Hephaestus became angry for any reason, so he was certain
Oedipus: The Mysteries of Fate Robert Choi Among the first thing a historian discovers in his study of early civilization are records of people\'s belief, or faith, in powers greater than themselves, and their desire to understand what causes these powers to act. People everywhere wonder about the marvelous things in the sky and on the earth. What makes the rain? How do the plants and animals live and grow and die? Why are some people lucky and others unlucky? Some believe in free will while oth
Balder: God of Light, Joy, Purity, Beauty, Innocence, and Reconciliation The god of light, joy, purity, beauty, innocence, and reconciliation. Son of Odin and Frigg. He was loved by both gods and man and was considered to be the best of the gods. He had a good character, was friendly, wise and eloquent, although he had little power. His wife is Nanna, daughter of Nep, and their son is Forseti, the god of justice. Balder\'s hall is Breidablik ("broad splendor"). Most of the stories about Balder c
"Tristan\'s Tragedy" As told to (author\'s name) By Tristan "What an unusual Christian name, \'(author\'s name)\'! And you say you know but two languages? You must jest to render the title of \'scholar\' upon yourself. During my training, I have learned seven, all the while being taught horsemanship and swordsmanship. Alas, all of my accolades serve me not here. True nobility never makes excuses for shortcomings; however, in this despair I can know no greater loss. After being wounded in battle
Greek Architecture and Orders Greek Architecture Greek architecture has been noted as some of the world\'s finest buildings known to man kind. Such as the Parthenon, and the temples they built to their Gods, have been studied over for many years. The way these structures were built is fascinating. The Three Greek Orders of Architecture Greek architecture is broken down into three orders. These orders were determined by the way that the top or capital of each column was sculpted. The first order
Ancient Greek Olympics Reporting today\'s Olympic games is like a technological masterpiece. The athletes compete in many events, their times and scores are tallied and sent worldwide by satellites and high-tech computers within seconds. Each event is carefully watched and recorded with a sense of history. There was no such sense of history or records when the first Games began in Ancient Greece. The first recorded champion in Greece was a sprinter, Coroebus, he was a cook in a near by Greek cit
Greek Architecture Greek influence is visable in everything that we have today. Our laws, cities and even our system of goverment all come from asppects of greek civilization, but maybe what we have been influenced the most gy the greeks is in architecture. Maybe the reason this is, is that it was a new form of architecture that had little to do with function and everything to do with looks. Agood example is the Greek temple. They were built in honor of the gods, but the architects were most lik
Greek Gods Welcome to my report on Greek gods and myths. You will learn about the gods and what they did. It is also about the myths and legends of Greece. greek gods The gods of Greece are alike many other types of gods. They were pictured a lot like human men and women. The Greeks didn\'t worship any animals. The gods, like people were endowed with many weaknesses. The gods could be jealous, envious, spiteful, and petty. The gods were held to be immortal, but they had a beginning. The rites of
Greek Literature GREEK LITERATURE. The great British philosopher-mathematician Alfred North Whitehead once commented that all philosophy is but a footnote to Plato . A similar point can be made regarding Greek literature as a whole. Over a period of more than ten centuries, the ancient Greeks created a literature of such brilliance that it has rarely been equaled and never surpassed. In poetry, tragedy, comedy, and history, Greek writers created masterpieces that have inspired, influenced, and c
Greek Mythology The ancient Greeks used stories containing God\'s to explain the way life was. Often times there were lessons to be learned that described human behavior. To the Greeks the myths were looked at as examples of good and bad behavior and its effects. they worshipped the Gods and tried not to offend them in any way. The story of creation is a prime example of how the Greeks viewed the heavens and the earth. Zeus was the king of the sky, earth, and men. Zeus\' son Apollo urged all Gre
The Shield of Achilles The shield of Achilles plays a major part in the Iliad. It portrays the story of the Achaeans and their fight against the Trojans in a microcosm of the larger story. Forged by the god, Hephaestus, who was a crippled smith, it depicts the two cities and the happenings within, as well as Agamemnon\'s kingly estate. To gain insight into the details and intricacies of the shield, one must look at the shield itself, the cities depicted within the shield, and the King\'s Estate
The Trojan War The Trojan War took place in approximately the 13th century. The ancient Greeks defeated the City of Troy. The Trojan War started after an incident at the wedding feast of Peleus, the king of Thessaly, and Thetis, a sea goddess. All the gods and goddesses of Mt. Olympus had been invited except Eris, the goddess of discord. Eris was offended and tried to stir up trouble among the guests at the feast. She sent a golden apple inscribed “For the most beautiful.” Hera, Athena, and Aphr
Does Hamlet Have A Tragic Flaw? Question: Does Hamlet have a tragic flaw? If so, what is it and how does it effect his surroundings and how does it effect Hamlet himself? What is the outcome of his flaw? Hamlet has a tragic flaw in his personality and behavior. His flaw is that he is overly concerned with death and tragedy. This flaw or weakness in Hamlet leads him into a world of chaotic surroundings and madness. Hamlet\'s flaw and his mad personality led to the death of several people, includi
Much Ado About Nothing: An Overview It is a beautiful spring afternoon. The air is full of the radiance of freshly bloomed daisies and the energizing chill of the periodic spring breeze. Puffy large cumulus clouds fill the azure sky with gray thunderheads looming off in the distance. Looking down from the clouds, one can see a gathering of finely dressed people. Birds flying overhead hear the murmurs of the crowd gathered for a wedding of gentry. Shakespeare could never have planned the first sc
Nature To Love Ones In Shakespeare\'s "My Mistress\' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun" and "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer\'s Day?" In the poems "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer\'s Day?" and "My Mistress\' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun", William Shakespeare compares his loved ones to nature. He uses natural elements in order to show that nature is superior to human beings. However, the poet comes to the conclusion that despite the fact that nature is more perfect than human beings, he loves his
Romeo and Juliet: Forbidden Love Leads To Death We just finished reading the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. In this play we are introduced to the tragic story of their forbidden "love" which ultimately leads to their deaths. Although Romeo and Juliet is considered to be a timeless love story, I find Romeo to be too immature for this to be so. When we are first introduced to Romeo, he is involved with a girl by the name of Rosaline. Benvolio inquired about Romeo\'s situation with h
Time and Fate in Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet, said to be one of the most famous love stories of all times, is a play anchored on time and fate. Some actions are believed to occur by chance or by destiny. The timing of each action influences the outcome of the play. While some events are of less significance, some are crucial to the development of this tragedy. The substantial events that inspire the conclusion of Romeo and Juliet are; the Capulet ball, the quarrel experienced by Tybalt and
Comparison of Shakespeare\'s Sonnet 73 and Sonnet 116 William Shakespeare, in his Sonnet 73 and Sonnet 116, sets forth his vision of the unchanging, persistent and immovable nature of true love. According to Shakespeare, love is truly "till death do us part," and possibly beyond. Physical infirmity, the ravages of age, or even one\'s partner\'s inconstancy have no effect upon the affections of one who sincerely loves. His notion of love is not a romantic one in which an idealized vision of a lov
Franco Zeffirelli and Baz Luhrmann\'s Romeo and Juliet Sex, drugs, and violence are usually a potent combination, and only William Shakespeare could develop them into a masterful, poetic, and elegant story. In the play, "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet," all these aspects of teenage life absorb the reader or watcher. It is understood that Hollywood would try to imitate this masterpiece on screen, and it has done so in two films: Franco Zeffirelli\'s 1968 "Romeo and Juliet" and Baz Luhrmann\'s 19
Shakespeare\'s Sonnet 19 In his Sonnet 19, Shakespeare presents the timeless theme of Time\'s mutability. As the lover apostrophizes Time, one might expect him to address "old Time" as inconstant, for such an epithet implies time\'s changeability. But inconstant also suggests capricious, and the lover finds time more grave than whimsical in its alterations. With the epithet "devouring" he addresses a greedy, ravenous hunger, a Time that is wastefully destructive. Conceding to Time its wrongs, th
The Taming of the Shrew: Katherine In William Shakespeare\'s play, The Taming of the Shrew, the shrew played by Katherine, had a terrible outlook on life and just about everything else. Her negativity caused by her younger, more beautiful sister Bianca. Bianca wanted to get married. She had all of the men\'s hearts, Katherine had none. If Katherine got married then Bianca could get married. She truly was a shrew who needed to be tamed. Then Petruchio came to Padua. Petruchio couldtame Katherine
Romeo and Juliet: Romeo - A Tragic Hero Shakespeare is a well known author who wrote in the 1500\'s. Many of his plays are classified as tragedies. According to the Oxford dictionary of current English, a tragedy is described as a serious disaster or a sad event. In Shakespeare plays, tragedy is identified as a story that ends unhappily due to the fall of the protagonist, which is the tragic hero. For a play to be a tragedy, there must be a tragic hero. In the play Romeo and Juliet, Romeo is the
The Role of Prejudice In The Merchant of Venice This paper discusses the subject of prejudice in the William Shakespeare play, The Merchant of Venice. I. Introduction William Shakespeare\'s satirical comedy, The Merchant of Venice, believed to have been written in 1596 was an examination of hatred and greed.The premise deals with the antagonistic relationship between Shylock, a Jewish money-lender and Antonio, the Christian merchant, who is as generous as Shylock is greedy, particularly with his
Prince Henry and Dr. Faustus: The Trials of Becoming a Hero Hero worship has existed in this world since the beginning of time, from the Jews honoring Moses, to the Germans honoring Adolf Hitler. Becoming a hero is a very difficult thing to accomplish. One must be successful in gaining the reverence of one\'s peers while at the same time not developing to big of an ego. Two examples of men trying to become heroes are Prince Henry and Dr. Faustus. Both, in their respective plays, have the capabil
Twelfth Night: Theme of Love In the play "Twelfth Night," Shakespeare explores and illustrates the emotion of love with precise detail. According to "Webster\'s New World Dictionary," love is defined as "a strong affection or liking for someone." Throughout the play Shakespeare examines three different types of love: true love, self love and friendship. "Twelfth Night" consists of many love triangles, however many of the characters who are tangled up in the web of love are blind to see that thei
Beowulf and Grendel: Craving for the Queen Brittney Turner In both texts, Beowulf and Grendel, the main purpose of the Queen\'s are to serve the courts as "weavers of peace". In Grendel however, Queen Wealththeow is described in much greater detail and serves a further purpose. The reader gains insight to a part Grendel that is not present in Beowulf, his desire for a human. It was not unusual for women to be offered as tokens of peace within the noble courts. In the novel Grendel, Wealhtheow\'s
Pride and Prejudice: Summary Mark Hines Jane Austen\'s Pride and Prejudice is a complex novel that relates the events surrounding the relations, lives, and loves of a middle-upper class English family in the late nineteenth century. Because of the detailed descriptions of the events surrounding the life of the main character of the story, Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice is a very involving novel whose title is very indicative of the themes contained therein. The first volume opens in the B
Richard Lederer: His Works Richard Lederer was once asked where he would get all these funny stories he answered: "Ever since I became a writer, I had found that questions the most difficult to answer and had only recently come up with an analogy that I thought would satisfy both my audience and me. Pouncing on the opportunity to unveil my spanking new explanation, I countered with, Where does the spider get its web? The idea, of course, was that the spider is not aware how it spins out its intr
Creative Writing: Equality Nausea. To describe the whole situation in one word I would have to choose nausea. The Expo center was packed with societies elite, eagerly waiting the announcement of what the rumor mill had told them to be the most important invention of the decade. The air was cold and damp, like that of a hospital. Barley audible was the most annoying Michael Bolton song that I could imagine. As I got entranced by the dullness of the situation I noticed that the lights were slowly
Ethan Frome: Fantasy is an Escape From Winter Ethan Frome, the title character of Edith Wharton\'s tragic novel, lives in his own world of silence, where he replaces his scarcity of words with images and fantasies. There is striking symbolism in the imagery, predominantly that of winter which connotes frigidity, detachment, bleakness and seclusion. Twenty-eight year old Ethan feels trapped in his hometown of Starkfield, Massachusetts. He marries thirty-four year old Zeena after the death of his
Goethe in Faust and Shelley in Frankenstein: Still the Wretched Fools They Were Before Jeremy Burlingame Goethe in Faust and Shelley in Frankenstein, wrap their stories around two men whose mental and physical actions parallel one another. Both stories deal with characters, who strive to be the übermensch in their world. In Faust, the striving fellow, Faust, seeks physical and mental wholeness in knowledge and disaster in lust. In Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein struggles for control over one
First Love: Pathway to Adulthood Love is one of the strongest emotions that a human being can feel. It can arise ever so suddenly, spreading a feeling of warm happiness through every inch of a person; like wildfire spreading through a tree. But as the feelings become more intense, the flame of passion can turn into a blazing fire that burns painfully through every vein. A person\'s first love is especially powerful because it grows from an innocent, naïve passion. Such was the case for both Vlad
The Grapes of Wrath: Symbols The Grapes of Wrath is a novel by John Steinbeck that exposes the desperate conditions under which the migratory farm families of America during the 1930\'s live under.   The novel tells of one families migration west to California through the great economic depression of the 1930\'s.  The Joad family had to abandon their home and their livelihoods.  They had to uproot and set adrift because tractors were rapidly industrializing their farms.  The bank took possession
An Examination of Similes in the Iliad - and how Homer\'s Use of Them Affected the Story In the Iliad, Homer finds a great tool in the simile. Just by opening the book in a random place the reader is undoubtedly faced with one, or within a few pages. Homer seems to use everyday activities, at least for the audience, his fellow Greeks, in these similes nearly exclusively. When one is confronted with a situation that is familiar, one is more likely to put aside contemplating the topic and simply i
Interpreting Edith Wharton\'s "Roman Fever" Definitive criteria for judging the success or failure of a work of fiction are not easily agreed upon; individuals almost necessarily introduce bias into any such attempt. Only those who affect an exorbitantly refined artistic taste, however, would deny the importance of poignancy in literary pieces. To be sure, writings of dubious and fleeting merit frequently enchant the public, but there is too the occasional author who garners widespread acclaim a
Poem "Lucifer in the Starlight": New Meanings and Ideas Examining a poem in detail can bring out new meanings and ideas. By careful analysis, the full beauty of the poem can be appreciated. The poem "Lucifer in Starlight (p. 959)", by George Meredith, can be analyzed to refine the authors purpose, by examining every subtle hint, every possibility, for a deeper theme. Also, "deciphering" formal literary techniques such as metaphor, connotation, and symbolism is the key to unlock other expressions
The Elusive Form: The Use of Female Characters in "Naked Nude" Michael McBee Thesis and Outline: Thesis: In his picturesque short story, "The Naked Nude", Bernard Malamud uses the female characters to develop, enact, and resolve Fidelman\'s epiphany and to bring about the protagonist\'s final, artistic self-understanding. I. Introductory paragraph--statement of thesis. II. The prostitutes A. in contrast to Fidelman\'s initial idea of the artistic nude B. "maybe too many naked women around made i
Book Review: Nemesis Name of Book: Nemesis Author: Isaac Asimov was born in 1920 in Petrovichi, Russia. When he was three years of age, his family immigrated to the United States and settled in Brooklyn, New York. Asimov turned to full time writing in 1958. This accomplished writer is best known for his novels dealing with science fiction. However, his works extend to other subjects. These include humour, mystery, history, and some volumes involving the Bible and Shakespeare. He has published ar
Essay About Odysseus, Adonis, and Thor Section I: "Odysseus Is The Most Cunning Man in the World" Odysseus, son of Procris and Cephalus of the Royal House of Athens, played a major role in the Trojan War. However, the legends of Odysseus do not begin until after the great war. At the end of the war he was separated from the rest of the Greek armies and was forced to wander for ten years until he was reunited with his family. His journeys in those ten years were very similar to Jason\'s journey i
Krapp\'s Last Tape: Imagery in Color During the 20th century, there was an evident disillusion and disintegration in religious views and human nature due to the horrific and appalling events and improvements in technology of this time, such as the Holocaust and the creation of the atom bomb. This has left people with little, if any, faith in powers above or in their own kind, leaving them to linger in feelings of despair and that life is an absurd joke. From these times grew the Theater of Absur
Differences Between 18th Century Literature and Romantic Poetry Seen Through The Works From Alexander Pope and John Keats The differences between eighteenth-century literature and romantic poems, with respect to history is constituted here. This is seen through the influential works of John Keats and Alexander Pope. These works are acknowledged as, "The Rape of Lock" and "The Eve of St. Agnes." Alexander Pope takes his readers on a hatred filled epic. A robust piece of literature and love induce
Robert Frost\'s "Two Tramps In Mud Time" On the surface, "Two Tramps in Mud Time" seems to display Robert Frost\'s narrow individualism. The poem, upon first reading it, seems incongruent, with some of the stanzas having no apparent connection to the whole poem. The poem as a whole also does not appear to have a single definable theme. At one point, the narrator seems wholly narcissistic, and then turns to the power and beauty of nature. It is, however, in the final third of the poem where the n
Romantic Sonnet The Romantic sonnet holds in its topics the ideals of the time period, concentrating on emotion, nature, and the expression of "nothing." The Romantic era was one that focused on the commonality of humankind and, while using emotion and nature, the poets and their works shed light on people\'s universal natures. In Charlotte Smith\'s "Sonnet XII - Written on the Sea Shore," the speaker of the poem embodies two important aspects of Romantic work in relating his or her personal fee
The Scarlet Letter: The Harsh Puritan Society In Nathaniel Hawthorne\'s The Scarlet Letter, life is centered around a rigid, Puritanistic-structured society in which one is unable to divulge his or her innermost thoughts and secrets. Every human being needs the opportunity to express how they truly feel, or the emotion is bottled up until it becomes volatile. Unfortunately, Puritan society did not permit this expression, so characters had to seek alternate means in order to relieve themselves. L
Sociopolitical Philosophy in the Works of Stoker and Yeats Around the turn of this century there was widespread fear throughout Europe, and especially Ireland, of the consequences of the race mixing that was occurring and the rise of the lower classes over the aristocracies in control. In Ireland, the Protestants who were in control of the country began to fear the rise of the Catholics, which threatened their land and political power. Two Irish authors of the period, Bram Stoker and William But
The Pearl: Evil In The Pearl, by John Steinbech, evil transforms certain humble citizens into envious savages. Evil was exhibited by the doctor who refused to treat Coyotito because his parents had no money. When the doctor heard of Kino and Juana\'s fortune in finding "the pearl of the world" (722), he boasted that they were patients of his while thinking of a better life for himself in Paris. Coyotito was healed when the doctor finally came to their straw hut. He deceived Kino by giving the ba
The Crucible: Hysteria and Injustice Thesis Statement: The purpose is to educate and display to the reader the hysteria and injustice that can come from a group of people that thinks it\'s doing the "right" thing for society in relation to The Crucible by Arthur Miller. I. Introduction: The play is based on the real life witch hunts that occurred in the late 1600\'s in Salem, Massachusetts. It shows the people\'s fear of what they felt was the Devil\'s work and shows how a small group of powerfu
The Deerslayer: View of The Native Americans James Fenimore Cooper was born on September 15, 1789 in Burlington, New Jersey. He was the son of William and Elizabeth (Fenimore) Cooper, the twelfth of thirteen children (Long, p. 9). Cooper is known as one of the first great American novelists, in many ways because he was the first American writer to gain international followers of his writing. In addition, he was perhaps the first novelist to "demonstrate...that native materials could inspire sign