William Shakespeare’sA Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a play written just prior to 1595 by the most well known dramatist, William Shakespeare. This play has a rather complicated plot, which at times seems very simple to understand. Its setting is in Athens, where Theseus and Hippolyta are preparing for their coming marriage. The complications start when Lysander, Demetrius, Helena, and Hermia are introduced.


All four of these young lovers are entangled in a very confusing scenario. Additionally, Oberon the king of fairies feeling sorry for the confounded group orders that a special love juice be rubbed onto Demetrius’ eyes. Puck, Oberon’s servant, mistakes Lysander for Demetrius making the situation even more baffling when applying the juice.


Fairies play a major role in this play. Fairies were known as evil beings when this play was written and performed. Shakespeare renders Oberon to feel sympathy for Helena and thus portraits the image of fairies being kind.


There are many kinds of symbolism and figures of speech in this play as well. In scene 1 act 5, Theseus says, “That is hot ice, and wondrous strange snow”. He uses this phrase after the Philostrate tells him that the play is “merry and tragical” and “tedious and brief”.


All things considered, A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a blend of comedy, confusion, and love, all united and sprinkled with a bit of magic and illusion.