THE SALES OF GOODS ACT 1979 & 1995





Product was not fit for the purpose it was bought.





The sales of Goods Act from 1879 and 1995 are one of the most important acts. This is to make sure goods are as they have been described, of satisfactory quality also fit for the purpose for which they are intended. If the goods do not meet these aims the court gets involved. Second hand goods are also covered by this act. The court looks really carefully at how long it has been since the product bought also how much was paid then they decide about the amount of compensation. If a customer buys a product which so obvious and can be clearly seen that it is faulty you can’t complain the same fault.





As described:


Explanation - This means the products must be like it has been shown in detail either in a picture or in words.


Example - Waterproof coat should not soak in water.





Of satisfactory quality:


Explanation - This means the product should be worth its price and work as long it has been guaranteed.


Example - If a consumer bought a coat and when used it got torn because the make was not good and the coat was guaranteed to long for at least 12 months that was a waste of money.





Fit for the purpose for which they are intended:


Explanation - This means products must carry out the purpose it has been made.


Example - A printer should only print 1 copy if asked, not too many, that’s a waste of paper and ink.