The Downfall of Macbeth

Macbeth\'s love for Lady
Macbeth, in William Shakespeare\'s tragedy Macbeth,
caused Macbeth to feel the need to prove his manhood,
which eventually lead to his downfall. Macbeth was not
secure in his manhood, so he felt the need to prove himself
to Lady Macbeth. After he proved he was a man by killing
Duncan, and he felt he had a lot of power to do whatever he
wanted. Macbeth became desensitized between all the killing
and the hype of being the King. In the beginning of the play
Macbeth showed his love for Lady Macbeth in many
different ways. He told her his feelings toward her "My
dearest love" (act I, scene v, l 58). Macbeth listens to what
Lady Macbeth has to say, and takes her advice into
consideration every time he makes a decision. He also has
great love for her and tries his best to make her happy no
matter what it takes. Then Lady Macbeth convinced
Macbeth that he wasn\'t a man unless he went through with
the murder of Duncan. She threatens his manhood by saying
"When you durst do it, then you were a man;/ And to be
more than what you were, you would/ Be so much more the
man" (act I, scene vii, l 49-51). This made Macbeth begin to
think, and slowly but surely Lady Macbeth had manipulated
his mind to think the right thing to do was kill Duncan.
Macbeth had decided in order to prove his manhood he
must go through with this horrible act. Barta 2 After
Macbeth had committed the crime he felt that his soul could
never be cleansed no matter what he did. He said "They
pluck out mine own eyes!/Will all great Neptune\'s ocean
wash this blood/Clean from my hand? No; this my hand will
rather/The Multitudinous seas incarnadine, /Making the
green one red" (act II, scene iii, l 58-62). This shows that he
really didn\'t want to kill Duncan, but he did it in order to
prove himself to Lady Macbeth, and to become the king. By
the end he had no fear, and had killed not only Duncan but
also many other people. He now had different views from
which he had in the beginning of the play. Macbeth realizes
that he is no longer afraid "no, nor more fearful. (Act V,
scene vii, l 9). He is now considered a man, but he doesn\'t
like the fact that he has killed all these people. He is sort of
scared of himself and cannot realize what a horrible monster
he has become. Macbeth proved his that he could be a man
by killing, but in the end he couldn\'t believe that he went
through with all that. All that he had done eventually lead to
the death of his love, Lady Macbeth, which was the original
reason he felt the need to prove himself. Love is a strange
thing and people will do some crazy things when they are
truly in love. All this inevitably led to the downfall of
Macbeth.

Category: Book Reports