The Death of Uncle Tom











“Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?” were Uncle Toms last selfless words. Those few words, were from the lips and body that led the life of a sold-out Christianity. Uncle Tom never failed to surprise the reader with attitude of life, attitude of work, … attitude of Christ. His love, passion and zeal for God is constantly brought up and reminded to the reader. This fantastic man, though put in the hardest of circumstances, always comes out exemplifying life according to Gods will and continuously awes the reader with his amazing testimony.


The reader experiences a rush of emotions as Uncle Tom dies… The first thought that comes to mind as he is on his death bed is “Why didn’t he get the chance to see Chloe and his Children again?” Although a pitiful way to die, alone and without family… He was excited about heaven and God. As he breathes his last breath… One can only imagine his wonderful reunion with his Savior…then Eva. George Shelby’s love for him is astonishing and heartwarming. In this scene, Stowe paints a sad picture of his death and of George’s reaction to it. As the reader, you are right beside them, watching the tears in George’s eyes, watching Tom change from present to…somewhere else.


Legree’s reaction to George and Tom’s death is sickening, as Stowe has made you Tom’s fan club. The reader practically cheers George on as he knocks him on the ground…thinking “It’s about time!” But also remembering Toms wishes for George to be a respecter of all men, all emotions are brought out separate with circumstance, yet tumbled together with outcome.


Stowe tells a very long, drug-out story of Uncle Tom…proving her points over and over till most of the story replays itself several times. This repetitive story of a slaves life, brings out emotions and thoughts of the simple reader that may have never been addressed before. Uncle Toms death really makes a person think deeper and deeper into how real slavery must have actually been. The ugliness of the reality of slavery sets in with her account of his death.