Revelation Revelation [PC1]


In O\'Connor\'s "Revelation," Godís truth about righteousness is revealed to Mrs. Turpin. The mechanism for revealing Mrs. Turpinís shortcomings is a young woman she would consider ugly, nasty and of low berth. Mrs. Turpin believes she is a righteous woman. However, what God reveals to her conflicts with her understanding of righteousness. Mrs. Turpin rejects the truth that righteousness would require her to be humble. That the poor and not so beautiful might march into Heaven before her was not acceptable with the station she had achieved in life. Not being able to accept the truth she challenges God. Mrs. Turpin recognizes the truth through a vision God communicates the truth of righteousness but even with Godís help she chooses to refute humility will help her see His plan.


Mrs. Turpin with her husband, enter their doctor\'s waiting room, she immediately begins to assess the other patients present. Seated in the room are: a pleasant, well-dressed lady; a "white trash" woman and her son; a fat adolescent with acne. Mrs. Turpin of course defines herself as high class, anybody else not her equivalent must be contemptible or "worse then a nigger any day." The well-dressed lady discusses with Mrs. Turpin the importance of refinement and good position. Mrs. Turpin comments, "\'I wish I could reduce." "Well, as long as you have such a good disposition," the stylish lady said, "I don\'t think it makes a bit of difference.\'" With indifference, Mrs. Turpin believed she righteous, and one of God\'s chosen people. The two ladies went on to discuss how you have to be nice to "niggers" to get them to do any work. The "white trash" woman tries to interject comments, but her statements only indicated her ignorance and poor breeding.


The fat adolescent reading her "Human Development" book raises her head every so often to scowl at Mrs. Turpin. At one point "she was looking at her as if she had known her and disliked her all her life-all of Mrs. Turpin\'s life, it seemed too, not just all the girl\'s life." Mrs. Turpin thought, "How pitiful it was to have a face like that at that age." The fat adolescent cannot restrain herself throwing her book at Mrs. Turpin, then tries to strangle her. The nurse and the adolescentís mother subdued her. The doctor sends her in an ambulance to the hospital before the adolescent is taken away, she whispers to Mrs. Turpin, "Go back to hell where you belong, you old wart hog." Mrs. Turpin refused any medical attention. She requested treatment for her husband so they could go home. When they arrived home "neither one of them felt like eating so they put on their house clothes, lowered the shades, and went to bed." The incident starts to humble Mrs. Turpin, "\'I am not a wart hog from hell,"\' she weeps. "She had been singled out for the message, though there was trash in the room to whom it might justly have been applied." "The message was giving to a respectable, hardworking, church-going woman." Mrs. Turpin did not understand why God would place the lower class people in her path to attack her. The adolescent lashed out at Mrs. Turpinís warped self-righteousness.


Mrs. Turpin scolds God demanding He justifies Himself to her. She railed, "\'If you like white trash better, go get yourself some trash then, you could have made me trash or a nigger.\'" Mrs. Turpin thought herself to be truthful during the moment she shouted,"\' I could quit working and take it easy and be filthy."\' The enraged woman yelled all of this at God with her hands pointed to the sky. Mrs. Turpin finally became so over whelmed "she opened her mouth but no sound came out of it." As the sun set, a "visionary light" fell upon her. She received a vision in which "niggers" and "white trash" marched on the bridge to Heaven ďahead of good, respectable people like her." For a moment Mrs. Turpin wants to change, however, she remains stubborn to belief, her truth not Godís. How can she accept this? "She lowered her hands and gripped the rail of the hog pen, her eyes small but fixed unblinkingly on