Reader Response


Engl. 101


M-W 1-2:50pm


04/15/03


The two chapters summarized in this reader response are: ‘Dundun’ and ‘Work’. Both chapters were equally captivating. I will begin with Dundun:


The story began as F. H. arrived at Dundun’s house in search of opium. He was out of luck. To his surprise, Dundun confessed that he had shot McInnes in the belly. Amazingly, McInnes was inside sitting on the couch. As F. H. entered the farmhouse, the environment was much too casual under the given circumstances. No one acted as if anything had happened. Hotel sat in front of a desk puffing on a pipe and Dundun entered the room offering McInnes a beer. After F. H. asked why no one had taken McInnes to a hospital, he was told that a failed attempt had been made. Apparently, Beatle, Blue, Hotel and the crew had ran their vehicle into the corner of a shed outside, and the front windshield was completely shattered. In an attempt at achieving higher popularity status, F. H. offered to take McInnes to the hospital. On the way to the hospital, Dundun sat up front as McInnes sat in the back. Shortly after leaving the farmhouse, McInnes passed away in the backseat. Awkwardly, F. H. revealed his hatred towards McInnes for calling him Fuck Head, and decided that they toss the body out of the car. As the chapter closed, we got a glimpse of the insanity behind the mind of Dundun.


The idea behind this chapter was clear to me. Drugs burn holes in your brain, which is obvious by the way Dundun presented himself in this chapter. I think that the author basically gave that example when he quoted “If I opened up your head and ran a hot soldering iron around in your brain, I might turn you into someone like that.” Drugs had tormented Dundun’s mind to the point of no salvation.


The following chapter, Work was interesting, yet sad. F. H. opened up the chapter hitchhiking, after a fight with his girlfriend. That morning, he boarded a bus and ended up at the Vine. Wayne, the only customer there, informed F. H. of a quick job that they could pull and come up with some easy cash. F. H. accepted the proposal and drove the two of them to a nearby neighborhood. They walked into an abandoned house, which Wayne later revealed used to be his. The objective was to take all the copper wire from behind the walls and sell them. While in the house, F. H. saw a redhead woman paragliding outside, along the shore. They continued their heavy man labor, and after stripping all the walls clean, they left the house. On the way to town, they made a brief stop to see Wayne’s wife. She was the woman who F. H. saw paragliding. After their departure, they turned in the scraps of metal for a measly 28 dollars each, and headed back to the Vine to spend their hard earned cash. At the bar, Wayne picked a fight with a huge black man, who would’ve ripped him apart, but he luckily evaded the exchange of blows, due to his drunkenness. A lady, whom F. H. strangely called his mother, served them drinks like no other bartender ever had.


In this chapter F. H. found himself at an all-time low. He shot up heroin, beat on his girlfriend, and worked for hours just to sell 28 dollars of copper, which he then spent on drinks at the bar. I think that the author wanted to illustrate a picture in our minds of what things had come to, due to the life he lead. Work accomplished.