Racism


Racism is not gone. We would all like for it to be. But it is here. Hiding in plain sight. Masked by political terms and ideas. But it is racism. Movements demanding certain diversity ratios are not only giving racism a strong foothold in American business but also they are counterproductive. The intention to secure positions for minorities in businesses is not a bad one if there are no ulterior motives. Instead of hiring some one because of their race it should be the most qualified person. Business should be blind to skin color. A company should hire the most qualified applicant no matter race. Making employers hire people because of their ethnic group is just as bad as not hiring them because of their ethnic group. Racism is a double-edged sword. It is a tightrope walk with equality and reverse racism and we as Americans have lost our balance.


Slavery was terrible. African-American slaves endured horrific treatment at the hands of white slave owners. Slavery was then abolished, leaving racism. African-Americans and white Americans were segregated for many years following the addition of the 13th and 14th amendments. Then African-Americans broke out of oppression and into equality. Now equal treatment is no longer good enough. Now they broke the balance. UNH’s Black Student Movement insists that the administration makes an effort to raise the population of African-American students to 300 by the fall semester the of 2004 school year. What did the administration do to this groups demand? They made a strong effort to meet it. How does this happen? The scale has been tipped and we have the obligation to even it out.


Groups like the Student Affairs Diversity Team (SADT) who have meetings with colleges and demand more diversity in the acceptance of students, are working against equality. At the University of New Hampshire there are 10500 undergraduate students currently enrolled. The SADT, with only 60 members, even made such ludicrous demands as creating a fulltime minority recruiting team. This team would be responsible for not only recruiting minorities but also doing everything they can to make it desirable to stay at UNH. Again this is a good idea but an illogical one because institutions should not cater to the needs of such a small group. To improve the quality of life or education is an excellent idea if you do it for everyone.


With institutions like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), equality is not the goal, inequity is. “In 1924, the NAACP asked unions and African American organizations to form the joint Interracial Labor Commission to accomplish the task of bringing more African Americans into the United States labor movement,” said Kweisi Mfume - President and Chief Executive Officer of the NAACP. This was not only a great feat but it was absolutely necessary at the time. Now as Americans we need to all be on a level playing field. If we are to get rid of racial discrimination then we must decide if special interest groups are still necessary. This might mean some people such as the NAACP need to give up some control to allow everyone an equal say in America. if equality truly is the goal then it should not be an issue.


Some people feel there has to be a certain ratio of ethnicity. This produces two dilemmas. The first is some students that haven’t earned the right to be accepted into these schools are because they are minority. The second reason being some students that have earned the right to be accepted into these schools are not because of their race. Colleges now have to comply with certain ethnic regulations when it comes to accepting applicants. UNH’s Black Student Movement insists that the administration makes an effort to raise the population of African-American students to 300 by the fall semester the of 2004 school year. What did the administration do to this groups demand? They made a strong effort to meet it. This is unacceptable. Students should be let in because of how they have preformed. Ethnic background should not be a factor. The scale has been tipped and we have the obligation to even it out. Mark Rubinstein, vice president for Academic Achievement and Enrollment Services at the University