******* Phonology Project ' Th inking a th ought', rather than ' s inking a s ought'I will be discussing the consonantal, (inter)dental th-sound. A sound which for many English language learners is hard to pronounce correctly. Not too surprising, since very often one's mother tongue requires very different ways and manners of articulation and usage of the various speech organs. There is a difference between the voiceless, (inter)dental non-sibilant fricative ‘th'-sound as in ‘thank you', ‘thick', ‘thousand' or ‘Thursday' (θ), and the voiced, dental fricative ‘th'-sound in words as ‘that', ‘then', ‘brother' and ‘feather' (o). I will discuss both, yet, will refer to the th-sound in singular form. Why I have chosen for ‘th'-sound I have chosen for this sound since I believe it is one of the most visual sounds when pronouncing and which one can quite easily model in front of one's students. By actually showing how to use the tongue and teeth when producing the sound, students will learn to pronounce it correctly since very often a visual presentation is easier to remember and apply. Another reason why I chose for this sound is because I feel it's one of the most obvious ones that make non-native English speakers stand out when it comes to speech. The English language contains a number of sounds and sound distinctions which are not present in many other languages. This may be the cause for these very common pronunciation problems, encountered by many students. In addition, many students will most likely make mistakes when it comes to syntax, grammar and vocabulary as well. Because also here, English -as many other languages- differs from the Hebrew syntax, grammar and rules of pronunciation. To make it even harder, English is written from the left to the right whereas Hebrew, from the right to the left, which possibly poses as an additional (mental) hardship to young students. The latter is probably related to difficulties encountered by Hebrew-speaking students who have learning disabilities; this may be the cause of the syndrome known as "dyslexia in a foreign/second language". Hebrew vs. English When teaching English to Hebrew-speaking students, one will frequently encounter some very specific problems. For starters, Hebrew is a consonantal language, whereas English is not. The basic written Hebrew alphabet consists of over 20 consonant sounds, yet no real vowels, whereas the English alphabet does have vowel sounds (A, E, I, O, U, (Y)), both written and vocal. This makes it difficult for Hebrew-speakers to ‘recognize' words, and in addition, hard for them to write. After all, they do not have the experience with writing vowels. Even though Hebrew has vowels that can be written under the letters, this cumbersome mode of writing is used mainly in lower grades, often only first grade, and there are even methods of teaching that use vowel-less words from the beginning.There is, you could say, an abundance of letters in the written English alphabet as opposed to a ‘limited' Hebrew alphabet. Try this for fun: the following sentence written without vowels will probably cause an English speaking student to raise his/her eyebrows: "Lv th Lrd yr Gd wth ll yr hrt". While most likely decipherable to most students ("Love the Lord your G-d, with all your heart"), this is the idea one gets when considering learning Hebrew is that there is a lack of consonants, whereas -as I mentioned before - in English, an abundance (comparatively speaking of course).Another point Hebrew-speaking students will have to realize, is that in any language, some sounds are left3548157
"Hebrew usually stresses the last or penultimate syllable in a word. This contrasts with English where syllable-stress is much more random. This may lead to Israeli students using intonation patterns that mark them as non-native speakers of English." -A guide to learning English
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"Hebrew usually stresses the last or penultimate syllable in a word. This contrasts with English where syllable-stress is much more random. This may lead to Israeli students using intonation patterns that mark them as non-native speakers of English." -A guide to learning English
produced by mainly using the ‘active articulators' (speech organs such as the tongue and lower lip) and some, when using the ‘passive articulators' (speech organs such