Mysteries

There are many mysteries that question the mind, but none that can compare to the intrigue in the supernatural. Ghosts, goblins, poltergeists, Death Omens, curses, unexplainable phenomena, and hauntings; mysteries of the paranormal could go on and on. There are centuries of ghost stories and tales that have been passed down from generation to generation. From the Bermuda Triangle mysteries, phantoms of the ocean, ships, and glowing ghosts of little boys, to the curse of James\' Deans\' car, The Little Bastard and the Amityville Horror. A little background history of this bone-chilling horror may help one decide whether or not to believe in the existence of the beyond.
"Everywhere on earth and all through history, people have believed that there is more to the world than meets the eye. Behind the outward material appearance of things there is sensed something inward, immaterial, and probably invisible."(Cavendish 1) Apparitions of things have been seen all over the world. The definition of apparition, as given by Richard Cavendish, is "the supernormal manifestation of people, animals, objects, and spirits." (Cavendish 25) In the ancient folklore of England and Europe, glowing ghosts of little boys who have been murdered by their mothers appear. This particular apparition portends ill luck and a violent death. The name "radiant boys" could have possibly originated in German folklore with the word "kindermorderinn." However, there are numerous radiant boy stories in the Cumberland area of England. These boys seem to resemble a flame ; slightly orange with a glow about them. These ghosts have never been proved to have caused any ha!
rm, they simply appear and disappear as mysteriously as they came. There has only been one claim that these radiant boys have attempted to cause harm or scare people. One account of the radiant boy apparition was in Knebworth, England when Edward Bulwer-Lytton stated that he had seen a strange glowing boy with long golden hair sitting in front of the fire. This boy then drew his finger and slid it across his throat three times. Later, however this story was proved to be false and just another attention-getting scheme by Edward Bulwer-Lytton.(Guiley 274)
Another mind-boggling series of apparitions was the Legend of the Faceless Gray Man of Pawley\'s Island. The story has it that this faceless man appears just before hurricanes strike at Pawley\'s Island off the coast of South Carolina. In fact, this particular apparition has been credited with saving thousands of lives. Residents of the island believe him to be the ghost Percival Pawley who was the first to settle and name the island. Whatever the case may be, inhabitants of the island claim that this faceless phantom appeared just before the hurricanes of 1822, 1893, 1916, 1954, and 1955. (Guiley 115)
A more recent ghost, and a female at that, was Resurrection Mary. Resurrection Mary is one of Chicago\'s most famous ghosts. This beautiful blonde, blue-eyed girl dressed in white has been reported in the Chicago environs since 1934, the year of her alleged death. Mary takes her name from Resurrection Cemetery where she is supposed to be buried. Her full name is unknown and her existence is unproved. According to legend Mary was killed one night in an automobile accident in 1934 after an evening of dancing at the Willowbrook Ballroom, formerly known as the O\'Henry Ballroom. Her ghost was said to have begun making appearances in 1934. She would hitchhike, and request a ride to the O\'Henry where she would dance the night away. After a fairytale evening of dancing, she would then request a ride home. She would give the driver vague instructions past Resurrection cemetery where she would mysteriously disappear. All of Mary\'s dance partners throughout the evening said tha!
t she was quiet, aloof and with icy cold skin. The only evidence or proof of Resurrection Mary is old cemetery records of a Polish girl near Mary\'s age buried in that same cemetery. (Guiley 280)
On different note, another type of supernatural mystery is the childhood fear of "Bogart" , or otherwise known as the "Bogey Man". Believe it or not, there is actually belief of the bogey man in English folklore. The Bogart is a"bogey" or type of hobgoblin that has habits like that of a poltergeist. Although at times the