My Creative Process



September 28, 2000


It all depends on my location. If I am at home, then my creative process starts with a cup of tea, preferably half jasmine blend. Then a comfortable place for sitting is chosen. With my knees under my chin and the steaming cup of tea, I take out fashion magazines and jewelry magazines. What better inspiration can you get then from the people that are at the top of the game right now? After looking at some pictures perhaps an exciting idea or two will show up, but if not there is always the last resort: the Style network. It is not necessarily pieces of jewelry that inspire me, but watching other designers go through the creative process.


Option number two for inspiration is shopping in New York. Notice that shopping does not necessarily imply buying. Going out in Soho or on Fifth Avenue is always a treat. The quality of the products that I see there and the meticulous attention to detail is what makes me want to work and to create, and with seeing the frontlines of fashion ideas for new and exciting things always appear.


The third option is the simplest. I can come into the studio and look at the torches and the machinery and just get inspired by the possibility of playing with fire and chemicals for the day.


When the idea actually comes there are some things that need to be involved. Sometimes it is a sketchbook so I can jot things down, and sometimes I want to play with metal right away. The one factor that I simply can not do without is music. The best music for me to be listening to when working is definitely Blondie or Pat Benetar. To me working with metal is all about power and control. It’s that inexplicable satisfaction that I can’t get from any other medium. And who better brings out that “babes with machineguns” feeling than those two?


The final ingredient to the recipe for creativity is blood in the fabrication process. There must be blood on the work. Not a pool of it but enough to get that self sacrifice for art feeling. A metal smith I once knew told me that unless you’ve shed blood on it, it’s not an artwork. And when it comes to my work I wholeheartedly agree.