Human Cloning is Wrong


I bet many of you have seen Star Wars, Jurassic Park, Multiplicity, or many of the other movies that describe cloning. Most of what you see in these movies is false. What you don\'t know if that cloning could be dangerous, to the clone and to our society as a whole. It\'s unethical to have a human clone.


What about identity? Humans are guaranteed the right to their own personality. What would happen if we overrode those rights by giving them someone else\'s genetic identity? True, personality is not bounded in someone\'s genes, but the clone would share any physical appearance or genetic defect of the cloned.


Also, there is a large power struggle here. Cloning involves a degree of power and control over another person\'s physical identity and that violates their rights and degrades their unique individuality. The person doing the cloning would have more power than any parent would have.


Cloning would also deal with killing embryos. You might not have known, but Dolly, the sheep that was cloned in 1996, was one of over 200 sheep embryos and hers was the only embryo that survived. The rest died or were thrown away. Imagine if the failure rate was that high when we started to clone humans. More than 200 embryos, the start of 200 human beings, would die for the sake of just one embryo that would have the same DNA as some one else.


Cloning someone, at this present time, would be extremely dangerous to the birth mother and the clone. In studies done on cows, 4 out of 12 birth mothers died. There is also a very high abnormality rate for the clone. There is a very high failure rate, which is showed in the cloning of Dolly. Even if you had a few good embryos, miscarriages have been prominent in animal tests.


So, should we forge ahead in the world of cloning? I say no. The risks outweigh the benefits. It\'s dangerous to the clone and to the birth mother. We would be killing innocent human lives in the process as well. It would also be a violation of the clones right to its own genetic identity and individuality.


Morals and Ethics of Cloning


Cloning is the process of taking cells from a donor, placing them in a culture dish where the nutrients are minimal, so the cells stop dividing and switch their "active genes". The cells are then put next to an unfertilized egg. The nucleus is sucked out of the egg leaving an empty egg cell containing all the cellular machinery necessary to produce an embryo. An electric shock is used to fuse the egg and cell together. A second shock is then used to mimic the act of fertilization and help begin cell division. After the egg has successfully moved to the stage of an embryo it is then placed in to the uterus of a surrogate mother. When born, all the genes are the same as the donor of the cell.


In 1997 Dr. Ian Wilmut, a British scientist successfully cloned a sheep named Dolly. This turned the scientific world upside-down. The success of the experiment is considered by all as an amazing achievement in science. However, ethics and morals must surface to regulate cloning. It is understood that individuality is the most important part of life. Individuality is given to a person at birth and considered a right they will have for rest of their life. There is also a fear that the clone may only be produced to live the life of the clone, thus causing severe emotional damage as well pain and suffering for the clone. The progression of the clone may be limited, the advance in idea development will slowly die off. Evolution could come to a halt, because with clones, diversity will be limited and there will not be as many advances in society. The cells, in all humans, will all be the same and there will not be a process of natural selection and diversity.


Another controversial question facing the cloning process is: How will the clones be treated? The emotions of the clones need to be taken in to consideration, after all they are humans too. "What is common to