How to solder onto PCB


Heat copper that is printed onto the circuit board. Heat the wire that is going to go through the board, poke it through and drop some solder onto the hole it is poking through and let it dry (takes about 4 secs). Wee heat up the copper and the wire to help the solder stick to it.


1. Touch soldering iron to both copper trace/hole metal and component lead;


2. allow time for all surfaces to heat (1 to 3 seconds);


3. touch the solder to the hot surfaces from opposite side of lead/hole as soldering iron;


4. allow enough time (about a second) for the solder (about 1/4") to flow into through-hole


and all around component lead. Watch as the solder completely fills the space between


the hole and lead (the solder should roughly be flush with the PCB surface when you are


finished);


5. Pull the solder and iron away, allow a few seconds for the solder to cool, and inspect your


work. Make sure the solder has flowed all around the lead and hole.


6. Clean the tip after every 3-4 solder joints.


Turning to the actual techniques of soldering, firstly it's best to secure the work somehow so that it doesn't move during soldering and affect your accuracy. In the case of a printed circuit board, various holding frames are fairly popular especially with densely populated boards: the idea is to insert all the parts on one side ("stuffing the board"), hold them in place with a special foam pad to prevent them falling out, turn the board over and then snip off the wires with cutters before making the joints. The frame saves an awful lot of turning the board over and over, especially with large boards. Other parts could be held firm in a modeler’s small vice, for example.


Here's a summary of how to make the perfect solder joint.


All parts must be clean and free from dirt and grease.


Try to secure the work firmly.


.


Clean the tip of the hot soldering iron on a damp sponge.


Many people then add a tiny amount of fresh solder to the cleansed tip.


Heat all parts of the joint with the iron for under a second or so.


Continue heating, then apply sufficient solder only, to form an adequate joint.


Remove and return the iron safely to its stand.


It only takes two or three seconds at most, to solder the average p.c.b. joint.


Do not move parts until the solder has cooled.


Components