GEORGES SEURAT AND POINTILLISM


REVISED LESSON PLAN





Overview: Students learn about Georges Seurat and the importance of pointillism as a technique used by artists. Students analyze how Seurat created A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte and how artistic elements (line, shape, color and texture) are incorporated into this masterpiece. Students make their own pointillism painting demonstrating their understanding of color, pointillism technique and composition.


Goal: To introduce the technique of pointillism. To create form by using color. Introducing color theories. Create brilliant shimmering colors by not hand mixing but by placing next to each other.


Unit Objectives:


q Students will examine Georges Seurat’s, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, by using investigational art criticism. Art is Inquiry.


q Students will explain George Seurat’s artworks from Paris, the style of his work (pointillism, neo-impressionism or divisionism), major period (post-impressionism) subject matter (impressionistic scene) and symbols (Art in Context)


q Students will research Georges Seurat and his techniques and write one page on their findings. Art in Context


q Students will explain the technique of pointillism and color theory


q Students will view examples of Seurat’s artworks and explain how these samples exemplify the use of line, shape, color and texture. Art in Context.


q Students will create a painting based on the style of Georges Seurat.


q Students will self-evaluate their own design by description, analysis, interpretation and judgement.


q Attendance, Participation and work in class.


ART AS INQUIRY ACTIVITY


BE AN ART CRITIC!!! USING YOUR CREATIVE MINDS, ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS ABOUT GEORGES SEURAT’S ‘A SUNDAY AFTERNOON ON THE ISLAND OF LA GRANDE JATTE’


1. Describe the subject matter and the objects in the background.


2. Analyze how Georges Seurat arranged the painting (composition, form, color) What are the major shapes he used (circles, squares, triangles, other)? Are the shapes organic, geometric or both? What colors did Seurat use in the painting? Complementary (colors that lie opposite each other on the color wheel)? Analogous (colors next to one another on the wheel)? Or other?


3. Technique: How did he make the painting? (patterns, flat shapes, contrast, color). What materials did he use?


4. Interpret: What is this painting’s meaning or message? What does this piece symbolize? What mood do the colors convey?


5. Judge the painting with the following explanations. You can choose more than one.


q The painting experiments with unusual shapes, colors or materials (formalistic)


q The painting communicates meaning and symbolic qualities (expressive)


q The painting has different functions (for protection, for praying, for protest, for education, other)


q The painting is realistic and represents a particular person or thing (representational)


ART CRITICISM ASSESSMENT TOOL (SCORING RUBRIC AND CRITERIA)


Exceptional: The answers provided clear evidence that the student understood how to describe, analyze, interpret, judge with reference to some art theories.


Competent: The answers provided good evidence that the student understood how to describe, analyze, interpret, judge with reference to one art theory.


Partial: The answers provided some evidence that the student understood how to describe, analyze, interpret and judge somewhat.


CREATING ART ACTIVITY


CREATE AN IMPRESSIONISTIC LANDSCAPE SCENE USING POINTILLISM


Procedure:


· Review the term “pointillism” (technique of portraying the play of light by using tiny brush strokes of contrasting colors. The eye optically blends the colors together)


· For subject matter, create an open landscape with a background, middleground and foreground. Use pictures for references or create the scene yourself.


· Have students draw three practice sketches of the landscape and have them choose the best one. Note: landscapes may include people to make composition more interesting.


· Have students do an underpainting of their chosen landscape on their canvas. Canvases will be 11 x 14” because pointillism is a tedious procedure and takes time.


· Review color theory. Analogous colors, complementary colors and color mixing. Students should understand what combined colors make what.


· After students have their underpaintings and composition laid out, they should now start the pointillism process. Creating forms through small dots of color unified together to create a whole. Make sure contrast is emphasized along with color combination.


· Students should start with the background, then the middle ground, then work their way up to the foreground.


· Students should have their colors laid out and ready to go. Plan ahead and know what color you’re making before you apply it.


· Explain your choice of materials and processes, viewpoints and symbols.


· Cleanup and Safety Precautions


· Evaluate your own painting by description, analysis,