Economics coursework guide
Choice of article:
Articles must not have been published more than one year ago.
Analytical commentaries from publications like the Economist are not appropriate.
The article should enable you to give a simple, precise analysis using two diagrams. If the article does not have enough quotes or information to support the use of two diagrams, you should find a different article.
The article should relate to a specific area(s) of the course. Areas that may be relevant are:
Micro
Supply and demand - particularly with regard to commodity prices
Externalities
Government intervention
Oligopoly
Macro
Inflation
Unemployment
Demand / supply side policies
Economic growth
Trade
Tariffs, quotas and subsidies
Exchange rates
Do not use the same article as other students or those shown in this guide. Similar articles on the same topic from different sources are acceptable. Try also to look for articles from around the world, rather than just from the UK .
Commentary writing:
Each commentary has a maximum word limit of 750. Around 350 words should be left for the evaluation.
Diagrams used in the commentary should show the use of different concepts. It is not appropriate for figure one and figure two to show a shift in the same curve (e.g. demand shifting left then right).
Diagrams should be annotated in the logical order demonstrated in class
Presentation:
The commentary should be handed in with a front cover sheet (see below)
The article should be referenced and presented in a text box (see examples above)
If the article is longer than one A4 page, quotations should be highlighted
Diagrams should be computer generated
The commentary should be 1.5 spaced using a 12 point sized appropriate font
A hard copy should be handed in with an electronic copy through SharePoint.
Example commentary
The article below appeared on the ABC news website at http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-11-11/denmark-to-scrap-world27s-first-fat-tax/4365176 and was published Sunday November 11, 2012.
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Denmark to scrap world's first fat tax
Denmark says it will scrap a fat tax it introduced a little over a year ago in a world first, saying the measure was costly and failed to change Danes' eating habits. "The fat tax and the extension of the chocolate tax - the so-called sugar tax - has been criticised for increasing prices for consumers, increasing companies' administrative costs and putting Danish jobs at risk," the Danish tax ministry said in a statement.
"At the same time it is believed that the fat tax has, to a lesser extent, contributed to Danes travelling across the border to make purchases." Against this background, the government and the (far-left) Red Green Party have agreed to abolish the fat tax and cancel the planned sugar tax." Denmark's centre-left minority government is made up of the Social Democrats, Social Liberals and Socialist People's Party, and requires support from other parties to pass legislation in parliament.
The government and the Red Greens reached the agreement as part of their negotiations on the 2013 budget bill. The previous right-wing government introduced the fat tax in October 2011 to limit the population's intake of fatty foods. According to the Danish National Health and Medicines Authority, 47 per cent of Danes are overweight and 13 per cent are obese. "Now we need to try to do something else to address public health," food minister Mette Gjerskov said, according to news agency Ritzau.
The fat tax has been levied on all products containing saturated fats - from butter and milk to pizzas, oils, meats and pre-cooked foods - in a costing system that Denmark's Confederation of Industries has described as a bureaucratic nightmare for producers and outlets. The measure added 16 kroner per kilo of saturated fats in a product. As an example, when the tax was introduced the price of a pack of 250 grams of butter rose by 2.20 kroner ($0.37) to more than 18 kroner ($2.95).Several food chains said on Saturday they would lower their prices accordingly once the tax is abolished, Ritzau reported.
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Denmark to scrap world's first fat tax
Denmark says it will scrap a fat tax it introduced a little over a year ago in a world first, saying the measure was costly and failed to change Danes' eating habits. "The fat tax and the extension of the chocolate tax - the so-called sugar tax - has been criticised for increasing prices for consumers, increasing companies' administrative costs and putting Danish jobs