Civil Rights Movement


Had there been more success then failures in the Civil Rights Movement between 1960 – 65


I believe there had been more success then failure in the Civil Rights Movement from 1960 to 1965.


There were the Sit-Ins that took place in 1960, the Freedom Rides in 1961, the Albany campaign, conflict in Birmingham, Alabama, the march to Washington in 1963; they have the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the 1965 Voting Rights Act.


On 1st February 1960, four students from Greensboro, North Carolina, Agricultural and Technical College, went into Woolworth and ordered food and drink at a “white only” counter. The next day they came back with 23 others, which included white students as well. The next there were 80 students. Their protest worked because on 6 February, Woolworth was forced to close. The Greensboro sit-in was so successful was because the protesters were students and, they had no jobs to lose, they had no one to be scared of, and they have a lot of time to spend. The Woolworth staff did not how to react, when these four students came in and they might have hoped that the students would not come again. This gave the students enough time to get other students to come.


The sit –in were a very successful and passive way to protest. Martin Luther King saw the potential of the sit – in, and got involved with it even though many other people thought it was a bad idea to use students as a way to get publicity. When Northern white people see these images of students, just sitting at a counter waiting to be served being attacked, this will make the southern whites look bad.


In the Greensboro sit-in it was a success because the students got the achieved what they set out for. Woolworth had a choice of, close it down or to make it desegregated. If they made it desegregated, Woolworth knew they would lose too many customers because Greensboro was in the South and the South hated to mix with the coloured.


Most of the sit –in were successful because, by the end of 1961, 810 towns and cities were desegregated in public areas.


In 1961, there were the freedom rides. The freedom rides were people testing if the federal government is carrying out its duty. The freedom rides would get on the bus in the north, where there is no segregation in the public services, and travel south, where there is still segregation in public services, even though that is a against the law.


When the freedom rides get to the south, there was usually a huge mob of protester waiting to attack them. By law, there should be police there to protect them but usually they would not have any one. The freedom rides were a success for the civil rights movement because; there was a lot of media coverage. Which meant everyone around the states would be able to see these images and see how these peaceful protesters are being treated just for sitting at the front of the bus. This type of unreasonable reaction from the southern white people will make them look like the thugs. The NAACP will use these pictures and videos when they are making speeches they can use these as example of the treatment, the blacks get for peacefully protesting. Yet again, the media is used to make the freedom rides a success.


The Albany campaign, in 1961. SNCC wanted to make a difference in a small place called Albany. They tried boycotts, rallies and protest meetings, but the Albany Local Police Chief, Laurie Pritchett, was a very shrewd man. He knew that if they reacted in an aggressive way then there would be great changes, like the other towns and cities the SNCC have been. So he told his men to prevent white demonstrators from being violent, and to handle the demonstrators gently. He promised to talk about segregation questions later, but he never did and every thing was back to how it was before. When King came the second time to protest about the lack of action being taken, he was arrested and then realised soon after because anonymous person paid for his bail, this means that King could not register his