Circuit Training

From reducing risk of heart attack to simply
providing more energy, weight training plays an
important role in one’s life. One very popular method
of weight training is to increase mobility and build
strength and stamina. This method is known as circuit
training.

Circuit training has been around for decades and
offers a wide variety of applications and benefits.
This workout is performed both mentally and
physically. The weight training participant performs
one set of an exercise then immediately performs a
set of another exercise in succession without rest;
one right after another. Exercise can be sequenced in
a variety of combinations, which isolate single
muscles, a group of muscles, or total body training.

Since muscles can only contract for long periods of
time when sufficient amounts of oxygen are available,
mental focus during circuit training is directed
towards the heart and lungs, as opposed just the
muscles during conventional training. The
cardiovascular and respiratory systems feed our
working muscles with oxygen filled blood that is
eventually fueled by body fat.

During conventional training the focus isn’t on the
heart and lungs because the cardio/respiratory
system rests between exercises, allowing the ATP to
LA cycle to be the energy supplier. (This cycle must
be depleted in order for the body to burn fat). By
performing circuit training, you don’t give your heart
or lungs a chance to relax, which keeps the ATP to
LA cycle depleted. In addition to increasing heart and
lung conditioning, enhancing your ability to use
oxygen, ad burning fat, impressive muscular shape
and strength gains will result from doing any
circuit-training workout.

Research studies consistently show that leans body
mass increases with a course of circuit training. A
1-3.2 kg gain in lean body mass can be expected with
a consequent decrease in relative fat mass of 1-3%,
total weight remaining unchanged. This is a major
benefit of circuit training, especially for those who
want to get in shape and tone up their muscles. With
traditional aerobic training, a decrease in relative fat
mass has led to a decrease in total weight with little
change in lean body mass. The resistance work
involved in the circuits encourages muscle-mass
development, and thus any fat loss is replaced equally
by muscle gain. This makes it easier to maintain the
lower body fat or reduce body fat even further
because the increase in lean body mass pushes up
basal metabolic rate and overall calorie expenditure.
These body-composition changes would support the
use of circuit weight training in a health and fitness
setting where toning up, but not losing weight, were
the major goals.

Circuit training is a great form of exercise, will help
almost anyone improve their health and offers lots of
benefits.

Category: Miscellaneous