Bridging the Divide with Technology
October 6, 2000


There exits a breach between culture and technology. The only way to fill that space is to introduce an innovative technological plan that would incorporate public education with cultural diversity. With the power of the Internet and the funding from federal, state, and district programs, Los Angeles educational schools could be enabled with complete cultural awareness with acceptance and no preconceived notion. Internet websites will supply all the information that one seeks about any culture, minute or gigantic in size and publicity, anytime. Free chat software and service would connect an Angelino student to anyone around the globe with no terrestrial limits. The immense invention of email will tie communication to any community with ease and no charge.


As the very least, desktop computers, with an adequate ratio of student to computer, should be available at all Los Angeles schools. Using the many grants available, Internet access and technology in the classroom would be established as well. Student could then learn basic computer skills from typing to word processing. Advance users may excel with the knowledge of computer programming to highly developed Internet networking.


The Latino culture, along with the many other diverse cultures, has a heritage worthy for research. Students, like I, who have the curiosity are able to go on the computer, do a basic search for the specified culture or community, and have any and all information at his/her fingertips. The ability to communicate with a culture that a class has just learned about, in real-time access, using chat capabilities is just extraordinary. Human communication has reached new levels and to advance on it with the next generation of Angelino students will provide a extra weapon towards the city’s developing competition and innovation.


Events that integrate cultures together could also be explored using the control of the Internet and computer. Events like the Olympic Games tell a great deal about different communities and cultures, and their athletic talents. Research of independence days of various countries will illustrate traditional and modern ceremony and festivity. To have email access to anyone with the Internet is a advantageous instrument. Personal character, cultural awareness, and academic skill will flourish with the strength of the Internet.


As the very least, desktop computers with adequate ratio of students per computer should be available at all Los Angeles schools. Using the many grants available, Internet access and technology in the classroom would be established as well. Student could then learn basic computer skills from typing to word processing. Advance users may excel with the knowledge of computer programming to highly developed Internet networking. Conclusively, technology in Los Angeles’s education system is significantly needed. With benefits of cultural research resulting in tolerance and computer skills allowing cultural Angelino students to have an edge over others, the technological enhancement of computers and the Internet in classrooms is long over due. Personal character, cultural awareness, and academic skill will flourish with the strength of the Internet and computers in the classroom.