Barry Sanders

My article that I choice was about one of the most
interesting sports playerís of our time. Barry Sanders
arguably the best back ever to play the game of football.
Barry is not one of those players who is just out there to
make money, no he loves the game and is always trying his
hardest when he is out there. In my paper there is allot
interest information about Barry that not every one knows
about him. Barry Sanders was born July 16th, 1968 in
Wichita, Kansas. He grew up in a family being one of
eleven other children. When Barry was a kid he was
considered to be too short to play football well at the
college level. In fact, his 1,417 yards rushing in his senior
year of high school wasn\'t enough to impress college
recruiters. One recruiter told Barry\'s coach, "We don\'t
need another midget." Only two colleges offered Barry a
football scholarship. Barry accepted a scholarship from
Oklahoma State University and the rest is now history.
Here are some of Barrys career achievements that he has
done in the short time he has played the game. Which has
made him such the over achiever that he is. 1988, won the
Heisman Trophy Award for best player in the nation. 1989,
lead the NFC in rushing and was Rookie of the Year.
1992, became the Lions\' All-Time leading rusher. 1994,
rushed for the fourth best NFL season record of 1,883
yards and included a 237 yards in week 11 vs. Tampa
Bay. In 1996, became the first player in NFL history to
rush for over 1,000 yards in his first eight seasons, won the
NFL rushing title, selected to the Pro Bowl for the eighth
time and became the first player to rush for over 1,500
yards in three consecutive seasons. Sanders continues
adding to his extraordinary numbers on the field. He has
run for 1,300 yards and now stands seventh among the
NFLís all-time rushers with 11,472, having surpassed Ottis
Anderson, O.J. Simpson and John Riggins. Heís 128 yards
behind Kansas Cityís Marcus Allen, Sandersí
boyhoodhero when he was growing up in Wichita, Kan.,
and Allen was a Los Angeles Raider. Next year, providing
he keeps up this trend of 1,000-yard seasons, Sanders will
pass Franco Harris (12,120), Jim Brown (12,312) and
Tony Dorsett(12,739) and slide into third place behind Eric
Dickerson (13,259) and Walter Payton (16,726). Sanders
is the first player in league history to rush for at least 1,000
yards in eight straight seasons, and Thursday he was named
to his eighth straight Pro Bowl. "Anytime he touches the
ball, itís a highlight reel," says Allen, now in his 15th NFL
season. "The player most fun to watch, and by far, the most
dangerous player in the game today, is Barry Sanders. He
is jus! t remarkable. He is also, in my opinion, the guy
everyoneís still trying to crack." Mention any of this to
Sanders, and you would expect him to be bemused,
wearing the kind of bored look people get when theyíre
waiting in line at the grocery store. Youíve seen him being
interviewed on TV, standing or sitting in that same spot in
front of his locker, avoiding eye contact with the camera
and speaking in that unhurried monotone. There has always
been a kind of perceived uneasiness about him. But rattle
off a few of the aforementioned tales of changeóespecially
what his teammates and family have noticed about him
latelyóand he nods knowingly and begins, very
un-Sanders like, by answering a question with a question.
"When I first came into the league, I was 20 years old," he
starts out saying. "Now Iím 28. So wouldnít you expect
there to be some changes between 20 and 28?" Sure, you
say. He continues. "I know Iím more outgoing, especially
publicly," Sanders says. "I donít think any! of my brothers
or sisters, though, would ever term me as quiet or reserved.
Whenever I become more comfortable with people, I get
more open. And now, I just think Iím more comfortable
outside of my own little environment and people can see
more of me, more inside of the person. Before, I was a
person who felt out of their element and was just kind of
being, sitting back and watching everything. "At home, they
knew I wasnít just this quiet and reserved person, the way
people thought I was here. Itís just a matter of comfort,
thatís all it is. Even in the locker room, people that Iím not
real close with I can laugh and joke. And now, Iím more
prone to try to defend myself from attacks from Brett
Perriman and