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REVISION GUIDE
GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE
Unit 1: Understanding Prose
50% of GCSE marks. Exam 1 hr 45 mins .
THIS BOOKLET:
SECTION A: LITERARY HERITAGE.
ANIMAL FARM
25%

SECTION B : DIFFERENT CULTURES.
OF MICE AND MEN
25%.

Name ................................................................. ..................................

Date of Exam .................................................... ...........................
00
REVISION GUIDE
GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE
Unit 1: Understanding Prose
50% of GCSE marks. Exam 1 hr 45 mins .
THIS BOOKLET:
SECTION A: LITERARY HERITAGE.
ANIMAL FARM
25%

SECTION B : DIFFERENT CULTURES.
OF MICE AND MEN
25%.

Name ................................................................. ..................................

Date of Exam .................................................... ...........................
-3810057150
ANIMAL FARM
BY GEORGE ORWELL
00
ANIMAL FARM
BY GEORGE ORWELL

The examination will be divided into two sections:
 Section A : Literary Heritage (Animal Farm by George Orwell)
 Section B: Different Cultures and Traditions (Of Mice and Men)
Students must answer one question from each section.
Students may refer to a clean copy of the texts in the examination.
The texts must be free from any annotation or additional notes.

Question style
In Section A, students complete a three-part question linked to a short
extract from the text.
For Section B, there will be a choice of essays for each text.

Section A - Three-part question linked to a short extract
 There will be three parts to each question.
 The extract will come from a significant section of the text and will be approximately 250-350 words in length.
 Students will select relevant material focused on the key words of the questions, clearly expressing relevant points and providing evidence from the text.
 Students will be expected to relate the extract to the whole text.
 Both Foundation Tier and Higher Tier questions will focus on character, language and theme both within and outside the extract.
 Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar ( SPaG ) are assessed in this section.

Section B - Essay question
 Students will choose one of two essays.
 Students will select relevant material focused on the key words of
the question, clearly expressing relevant points and providing evidence from the text.
 Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the whole
text .
 Foundation Tier students will be given bulleted suggestions to support their response focusing on events, themes or character.
 The essay will be assessed for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar ( SPaG ) and Quality of Written Communication.

INTRODUCTION

Animal Farm is George Orwell's satire on equality, where all barnyard animals live free from their human masters' tyranny. Inspired to rebel by Major, an old boar, animals on Mr Jones' Manor Farm embrace Animalism and stage a revolution; they want an idealistic state of justice and progress. However, a power-hungry pig, Napoleon, becomes a totalitarian dictator who leads the Animal Farm into oppression. "All Animals Are Equal" has added to it: "But Some Are More Equal Than Others."

Three very important aspects of Animal Farm :
Animal Farm is an allegory , which is a story in which concrete and specific characters and situations stand for other characters and situations so as to make a point about them. The main action of Animal Farm stands for the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the early years of the Soviet Union. Animalism is really communism. Manor Farm is allegoric al of Russia, and the farmer Mr Jones is the Russian Czar . Old Major stands for either Karl Marx or Vladimir Lenin, and the pig named Snowball represents the intellectual revolutionary Leon Trotsky. Napoleon stands for Stalin, while the dogs are his secret police. The horse Boxer stands in for the proletariat, or working class.

The setting of Animal Farm is a dystopia , which is an imagined world that is far worse than our own, as opposed to a utopia , which is an ideal place or state. Other dystopian novels include Aldous Huxley's Brave New World , Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 , and Orwell's own 1984 .

The most famous line from the book is "All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others." This line is emblematic of the changes that George Orwell believed followed the 1917 Communist Revolution in Russia. Rather than eliminating the capitalist class system it was intended to