Essay on John Keats

This essay has a total of 931 words and 5 pages.

John Keats

John Keats was one of the last, great poets of the Romantic Era. He wrote poetry of great
sensual beauty and with a unique passion for details. In his lifetime he was not
associated with the senior poets who began the movement at the time of the French
Revolution. He was unlucky in the respect he didn’t, fit into the older, respected group
based on his age, nor in the younger group, for he was neither a lord nor in the upper
classes. He was one of the “middle class” poets of the then emerging middle class to gain
the attention of a public, which was then very snobbish about class and social status.


Keats was born in London on October 31, 1795. Keats was sent to Enfield School, which
had a strongly dissenting and republican culture, where he enjoyed a liberal and
enlightened education subsequently reflected in his poetry. His father died when he was
eight and his mother when he was fourteen; these sad circumstances drew him particularly
close to his two brothers, George and Tom, and his sister Fanny. (Kipperman 246). As an
orphan, he became a surgeon’s apprentice before enrolling, in 1815, as a student at Guy’s
Hospital. He registered for a sixth-month course of study required for him to become a
licensed surgeon and apothecary. Soon after he had came to a conclusion that he was not
going to be a doctor as a profession, his true passion was in poetry (computer). Though
some of his early poetry which was written when he was twenty just six years before his
death, the poetry didn’t seem “top-notch.’’ As his life played out his poetry became more
matured and astonishing. Because of his lack of education he spent allot of time studying
Shakespeare and Milton. He admired and imitated these two


2 Jordan
writers as reflected in his poetry. His quality of work has often been likened to
resemble Shakespeare. (Kipperman 245).


Few English authors have ever, had as much direct observation and experience of suffering
as John Keats. Soon after receiving his medical doctrine he returned to London. In
medical school he met Leigh Hunt and they began to write The Examiner, which brought the
love of poetry out in Keats. His writing career consisted of three books of verse during
his lifetime: Poems (1817); Endymion (1818), an ambitious long poem; and Lamia, Isabella,
The Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems in (1820), which considered to be one of the
landmark volumes of the nineteenth century, including the great “Odes” and “Hyperion.”
With this volume and other late poems Keats achieved his objective that poetry should be
great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one soul, and does not startle. A
sensuous richness and precise, detailed imagery characterize his finest work. Keats had
the ability to recreate and embody in words the vision or the sound of his subject whether
it be the painting on the urn in “Ode on a Grecuan Urn” or the music of a songbird in “Ode
to Nightingale” (Moore 10).

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