Brave New World: Comparing Life In the World State Essay

This essay has a total of 1102 words and 5 pages.

Brave New World: Comparing Life In the World State With Life In the US Today

By Aldous Huxley

Prompt: Compare life as Huxley described it in the World State with life in the
United States today.

For more than half a century, science fiction writers have thrilled and
challenged readers with visions of the future and future worlds. These authors
offered an insight into what they expected man, society, and life to be like at
some future time.
A society can achieve stability only when everyone is happy, and the
brave new world tries hard to ensure that every person is happy. It does its
best to eliminate any painful emotion, which means every deep feeling and
passion. It uses genetic engineering and conditioning to ensure that everyone
is happy with his or her work. Sex is a primary source of happiness. The brave
new world basically teaches everyone to be promiscuous. You are allowed to have
sex with any partner you want, who wants you, and sooner or later every partner
will want you. Children are taught through hypnosis that "everyone belongs to
everyone else." In this Utopia, what we think of as true love for one person
would lead to a passion for that person and the establishment of family life,
both of which would interfere with the community and its stability. Nobody is
allowed to become pregnant because nobody is born, everyone is a "test-tube"
baby. Many females are born sterile.
The ideas and ways of obtaining happiness are not too much different in
the brave new world than in our lives here in the United States. The only
difference is that these pleasures are looked at in different ways. Sex is a
very large part of our society's pleasure and everyone is allowed to have any
partner that he/she wants, but this idea is not taught at a young age and
everyone in our society does not feel this way towards sex. Our ideas and
thoughts on topics of this nature are much more broad, and everyone is entitled
to his/her own opinion. Families are established in our culture, which are
looked upon as something very good for our society. Women are allowed to become
pregnant as freely as they want and the government will even aid them in the
process. This is one difference that is totally different from the brave new
world. Women were a lot of times not even allowed to have children much less
have as many as they so desired.
Soma is a drug used by everyone in the brave new world almost everyday
It calms people and gets them high at the same time, but without hangovers or
nasty side effects. The rulers of the brave new world had put 2000
pharmacologists and biochemists to work long before the action of the novel
begins; in six years they had perfected the drug.
In the United States today, we look down on drugs heavily even legal
ones, for example, alcohol and tobacco. Certain drugs of this type have been
tested and the side effects have been noted to shorten one's life span and make
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